Psalm 41

Intro: In this Psalm David asks for the Lord’s deliverance from his enemies, and from what appears to be an illness. David teaches us how to cry to the Lord asking for Him to be gracious to us.

To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David.

1 Blessed is the one who considers the poor!
In the day of trouble the Lord delivers him;
2 the Lord protects him and keeps him alive;
he is called blessed in the land;
you do not give him up to the will of his enemies.
3 The Lord sustains him on his sickbed;
in his illness you restore him to full health.

4 As for me, I said, “O Lord, be gracious to me;
heal me, for I have sinned against you!”
5 My enemies say of me in malice,
“When will he die, and his name perish?”
6 And when one comes to see me, he utters empty words,
while his heart gathers iniquity;
when he goes out, he tells it abroad.
7 All who hate me whisper together about me;
they imagine the worst for me.

8 They say, “A deadly thing is poured out on him;
he will not rise again from where he lies.”
9 Even my close friend in whom I trusted,
who ate my bread, has lifted his heel against me.
10 But you, O Lord, be gracious to me,
and raise me up, that I may repay them!

11 By this I know that you delight in me:
my enemy will not shout in triumph over me.
12 But you have upheld me because of my integrity,
and set me in your presence forever.

13 Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel,
from everlasting to everlasting!
Amen and Amen.

Main Point: David starts by telling us how the Almighty takes care of those who take care of the weak(1-3). While these verse can seem disconnected from the rest of the psalm, this stanza is really a set-up for the rest of the Psalm. We can see that David views himself as that man who has taken care of the poor. He knows the Promises that God has given to those who take care of the weak, and he makes his petition based upon those facts. In the second stanza (4-7) David asks to be healed, and delivered from his enemies. Which he brought up as a couple of the things the Lord does for those who protect the poor.  In the third stanza we see David goes into detail about how his enemies wish for his death, and how even his close friends have deserted him. The last three verses we see David reassuring himself that the Lord will be faithful to His promises.

This psalm quite simply is David reminding himself and the Lord of His promises to bless those who have taken care of the poor. David uses that reminder to ask for the Lord to be gracious to him.

Interesting Points: The Lord’s promise to bless(and command…funny how those are linked) those who take care of the poor can be found Deuteronomy 15:10.

It is interesting to me how David when starting his prayer reminds God all that is involved in Deuteronomy 15:10. He expounds on it. It just so happens to be pretty much the exact request that David is about to make of God. Is this an accident? NO! David is purposefully planning out his prayer, and seeking to persuade the Lord to answer his prayer. What better way than to remind the Lord what He has promised?

I love that David focuses makes his request as an act of grace from the Lord when he says “be gracious to me.”  It is a reminder that all the Lord’s blessings, even those that result from our obedience, are acts of grace. They are not things we earned or deserved.

The connection to Jesus here is also interesting. Jesus was also betrayed by a friend who broke bread with him.

Emotional Reactions: First, it reminds me that my heart needs to be much closer to the Lord’s desire to help the poor. That convicts. Second, it reminds me that I am a poor and the Lord has been gracious to me. That brings thankfulness and joy.

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